viagra kaufen rezeptfrei

Posts Tagged ‘reading’

Next Page »

Need Homework Help? Do You Have Homework Wars?

January 3rd, 2011

Need Homework Help? Do You Have

Homework Issues? Homework Wars?

Homework Struggles?

Homework problems are very common. In fact, I think it would be fair to say that most parents at one time or another need to give homework help to their kids. This is whether your child is gifted, has an identified learning disability, has dyslexia, or ADHD. There are no favorites to homework help issues. Check out 3 possible causes to those homework reading issues There are actually 3 Roadblocks to Learning Reading. Whether your child has dyslexia, has an identified learning disability, is falling through the cracks at school or is even gifted… understanding what is interfering with their learning reading skills makes the difference in reading success or reading failure.

Parent's First Steps to Homework Help

I was speaking with a parent earlier today that is concerned about her daughter's homework and schoolwork. Her daughter struggles with writing assignments and math. She was interested in finding a tutor for her. I explained that might be what they need, but what is needed first is to understand why her daughter is struggling with writing and with math. If you don't know what is interfering with her learning you may do all kinds of good things for her but not end up addressing the underlying cause of her struggles. That is why we go through an assessment first, to identify what is going on - why is her daughter struggling. We learn 3 ways, by hearing, seeing, and doing. Within each of those areas there are 9 subcategories that affect learning. Having a problem in one, two, or more areas of auditory, visual, or tactile/kinesthetic processing affects how your child does their homework. These areas are learned skills so they can be improved, once you know what they are. Improving the underlying causes of your child's learning struggles improves their skills for life, making homework help a thing of the past. To find out more about the 3 Roadblocks to Learning Reading, see Homework Struggles? Or Homework Wars published a few weeks ago.

Additional resources for you on homework help with writing and study skills problems:

Why Use Graphic Organizers to Improve Writing? Struggling With Note-Taking, Reading Comprehension & Listening Comprehension? Parent friendly materials to use to improve Reading, Writing, Spelling, English, and Math Skills

Learning Reading Help: Auditory Processing Part 2

December 3rd, 2010

Learning Reading Help:

Auditory Processing Part 2

In the last post Learning Reading Help: Auditory Memory Part 1 I talked about learning reading and the one of the areas of auditory processing that affect learning reading, specifically auditory memory skills. Remember, when you need learning reading help you want to be sure you are considering all of the areas that may be problematic to learning reading. Whether you have dyslexia, an identified learning disability, are falling through the cracks, or are gifted, these areas of visual and auditory perception are the reason why you need reading help.

Learning Reading Help: Auditory Processing Areas

For example, if you have poor auditory memory skills, you will have trouble remembering the sounds of the letters you will have trouble with learning reading. But auditory memory is more than just direct recall of sounds. You need to be able to use the information you hear, manipulate it, and respond to it. If you have poor auditory discrimination you will have trouble with knowing if two sounds are the same or different. If you have poor auditory visual association you will have trouble with relating a particular sound with the letter that represents it.

Auditory Processing and Learning Reading Help Activities

So, what can you do to improve reading when auditory processing problems are creating so many learning reading problems? There are some very simple activities that can be done to improve learning reading. In the video I go over some specific activities so you can see how simple it is to improve learning reading. In fact some of these activities just take one or two minutes to do, and they can be done with the whole family so no one is singled out. These activities actually end up being quite fun and can be done right after dinner as a quick family time activity.

Watch the video Learning Reading Help: Auditory Processing Part 2 to find out more.

Stay tuned for Part 3 where I show you some materials that you can use with your children to improve not only auditory memory but 5 other areas of auditory processing and at the same time learn decoding and encoding skills that are critical to learning reading help.

Reading Comprehension Game Improves Learning Skills

October 2nd, 2010

Playing Reading Comprehension Game

Improves Learning Skills

What if you could play a game and improve your child's reading and listening comprehension at the same time? It also sounds too good to be true doesn't it? But a game really can improve reading comprehension. As a learning disability specialist and board certified educational therapist I have probably worked with every type of reading problem, dyslexia, learning disability imaginable over my 37 years or teaching.

Reading Comprehension Problems

Many of my students had reading comprehension problems. They were very frustrated with their reading assignments. It was so hard for them when they had to read their social studies book and answer the questions at the end of the chapter. And they would often read the chapter multiple times and still not be able to answer the reading comprehension questions. The problem was, no one had taught my students how to read for meaning. There is a specific way you read for reading comprehension. There is a certain way to listen for listening comprehension.

Solution to Reading Comprehension and Listening Comprehension Problems

As a result of teaching frustrated students of all ages, students that had given up on being able to understand what they had read, I decided to create a game that would teach them how to read for meaning and improve their reading comprehension. I knew from both working with my students and from research on learning that game playing was a great way to teach and reinforce skills. So I developed The Comprehension Zone: Rocket Rap to help them improve their skills. What The Comprehension Zone: Rocket Rap™ did for our child: "The Comprehension Zone: Rocket Rap had amazing results for one of our children.   We have been working with him on comprehension for years.  I often have him draw pictures of what I’m reading, we act things out and we read just a few phrases at a time and ask him questions whenever we are dealing with auditory learning.  He simply struggles in this area.  I was interested to see how he would do with Rocket Rap. We began playing Rocket Rap often.  The improvement was rapid and dramatic!  By the end of the second game he was able to play successfully and currently it is easy enough for him to pick out facts while listening that he likes to try reading the card himself. For the first time in his life our child will raise his hand when Mark asks questions during family worship and he will know the answer.  He will come up to us after church and spontaneously tell us something that he learned from the sermon.  He is so amazingly proud of himself and I’m amazingly thankful. For our child who has always struggled with comprehension, for these results, I would happily pay double.  We’ve tried things similar to this in the past, we’ve been focused on this problem for years, but Rocket Rap has been the first activity that has been successful.” Kimberly from RaisingOlives.com

4 Activities to Improve Reading Skills (Part 4 – Writing)

August 9th, 2010

Improve Reading Skills Part 4 - Writing

As a parent you have a large responsibility. You need to not only care for your child, you also need to watch over their education and be sure they learn with ease. Reading, writing, and spelling can be difficult for many kids. But as a parent, you do have the power and ability to help your kids improve reading, writing, and spelling skills. Now what I mean here is that you as a parent can help your child improve reading skills whether they have an identified learning disability, dyslexia, ADHD, are falling through the cracks or are gifted.

4 Easy to Implement Activities to Improve Reading Skills

Their are 4 easy to implement activities that each take just a few minutes a day to improve reading. 1. Improve reading fluency in 5 minutes a day 2. Improve spelling and learn the 8 ways we put letters together to make words 3. Improve reading comprehension by playing a reading comprehension game 4. Improve writing skills using specially designed graphic organizers I've already talked about how you can help your child improve their reading fluency in just minutes a day. I've already talked about how you can help your child improve their spelling skills in just minutes a day. And, I've talked about how you can help your child improve their reading comprehension by playing a game with them. so, today I’m going to talk about the fourth activity which is helping your children improve their reading – and that is by helping them with their writing skills.

The 4th Activity to Improve Reading Skills

The fourth activity to help your kids improve reading skills is to help your kids learn how to take notes with the graphic organizers found in Ten Minutes to Better Study Skills. These fill-in-the-blank graphic organizers make note-taking, paragraph writing, and essay writing easy. As a parent, I hated watching my son struggle with a writing assignment. I’m sure you feel the same way. One of the best things I found to do to make this note-taking and paragraph writing or even essay writing easier was to create graphic organizers that were easy for him to fill in. Then he wasn’t staring at a blank sheet of paper anymore. It was so much easier for him to fill in the blanks and within about 10 minutes he’d have his notes done. His life became easier and my life became easier too. We didn’t have the ‘homework wars’ going on anymore. You know, I’ve had students bring me their notes over the years that they had done in class when they needed help writing their paper from them. The sad thing was, they couldn’t make heads or tails out of their notes even though they used a ‘webbing’ system when they did them. The notes were just too hard for them to follow. That is why I created the graphic organizers the way I did, so students whether they had perception problems or not would be able to utilize the notes they took. It isn’t enough to take the notes. You need to be able to utilize them after you’ve taken them. Donna Walker Tileston, author of What Every Teacher Should Know About the Brain states, “Approximately 87% of learners either need to see the learning or do something with it. Using visuals with the learning will help students take in the information more efficiently, but even more important, it helps them to develop their own methods for organizing content.” Using pictographs, charts and graphs, graphic organizers, and note-taking models is the way to do this. So, give the graphic organizers from Ten Minutes to Better Study Skills a try. I created them in such a way that once he filled them out he’d actually be able to use them for study guides or for help in turning notes into paragraphs or rough drafts into final copies.

4 Easy Activites to Improve Reading Skills (Part 2 – Spelling)

August 4th, 2010

4 Easy Activities to

Improve Reading Skills Part 2

As a parent you do have the power and ability to help your kids improve reading skills. Now what I mean here is that you as a parent can help your child whether they have an identified learning disability, dyslexia, ADHD, or are gifted. There are 4 easy to implement activities that each take just a few minutes a day to improve reading skills.
  1. Improve reading fluency in 5 minutes a day
  2. Improve spelling and learn the 8 ways we put letters together to make words
  3. Improve reading comprehension by playing a reading comprehension game
  4. Improve writing skills using specially designed graphic organizers
My last post 4 Easy Activities to Improve Reading Skills (Part 1) talked about the first activity you can do to help your child - reading fluency. Today I’m going to talk about the second activity which is helping your children improve their reading - and that is by helping them with their spelling skills.

Improve Reading Skills - Spelling

So, the second of the 4 easy to implement activities to help your child improve their reading and writing skills is spelling. One aspect of reading is called decoding - the ability to sound out words. Another aspect is called encoding - the ability to spell the words you hear. Being a successful speller impacts your writing. Everyone actually knows the words you are writing because they are spelled correctly. So many kids struggle with improving reading skills and spelling and they don’t need to! Now I'm not talking only about children with LD or dyslexia or ADHD. Even gifted children often struggle with spelling. Spelling really doesn’t have to be so hard! If you understand that we just put letters together 8 ways to make words, spelling becomes easy. Spelling becomes easy for everyone, even children and adults with LD, dyslexia, or ADHD. The majority of words use the most common vowel pattern which is the vowel consonant pattern. Just learning this pattern alone will help your child improve their spelling because so many one syllable and multi-syllable words have at least one syllable in them that follows this spelling pattern.

Improve Reading Skills Example

For example, the word example has 3 syllables. The first syllable, ex is a vowel consonant pattern, the second syllable, am is also a vowel consonant pattern. Only the third syllable is a different pattern. The last syllable, the ple is the consonant + le spelling pattern. I explain that when you have an le at the end of a two or three syllable word, it grabs the consonant in front of it to form the syllable. I even grab their arm saying the le grabs the consonant in front of it like in table, purple, people, and example. Doing this body movement helps this pattern sink in to kids and they ‘get it.’ For more information on how to improve reading skills as well as spelling, see Making Spelling Sense. Making Spelling Sense teaches the 8 ways we put letters together to make words - the 8 spelling patterns with an auditory, visual, and tactile method. This special method is what really makes the difference because it addresses the underlying causes of spelling problems and at the same time it teaches the structure of the language and how to spell thousands of words.

The 5 Critical Steps You Need to Help Your Child Improve Their Learning Skills

July 15th, 2010
For those of you that missed last Wednesday night's call ... I wanted to pass this along as soon as I could.
Here is the link where you can go to listen to the Mid-Summer Activities to Improve Your Child's Skills Teleseminar.
You will want to listen over the next 3 days as it may not be available after that.
You will hear:
  1. Case Studies
  2. A current client talk about her daughter and how this method has changed their lives.
On the call you will learn:
  1. Why children and adults struggle with learning
  2. The Cone of Learning
  3. The 5 critical steps you need to help your child improve their skills
  4. The 6 activities you can do right now to help them improve their skills and still have fun.
Especially for parents wanting to help their:
  1. Struggling learners
  2. Reluctant learners
  3. Learners that take a long time to complete their work
  4. Learners that are 'falling through the cracks'
  5. LD, Dyslexic, ADHD learners
  6. Gifted learners
These activities work with kids of all ages - and even adults, too! Improve reading skills, writing skills, spelling skills, and math skills in minutes a day.
Listen before the recording is taken down!
Bonnie Terry, M. Ed., BCET

Mid Summer Training – What You Can Do to Prepare Your Kids for School

July 9th, 2010
Mid Summer Training – What You Can Do to Prepare Your Kids for School I Can Hardly Believe It? Check it out... The FREE Live Teleseminar is filling up fast – Only 100 68 52 Spots left! Reserve your spot now. Mid-Summer Training Call I have had so many calls from parents recently, wondering how to help their child between now and when school starts back up. They realize it’s not too late to give their child a boost, but they also want to be sure they have an enjoyable rest of the summer. So, I decided to have a teleseminar where I will present information on summer activities to help your child's skills improve as well as activities rich in experiences and family time. I'm hosting a FREE Live Teleseminar on Wednesday July 14th at 8 pm Eastern, 7 pm Central, 6 pm Mountain, and 5 pm Pacific. Upon registering you will receive a FREE Handbook on the 5 things you can do to help your child over the summer. Those that attend live will receive a surprise FREE gift. Searching for Mid-Summer Activities to Improve Your Child's Skills and Still Have Fun? FREE Live Teleseminar on Wednesday June 2nd at at 8 pm EST, 7 pm CST, 6 pm MST, and 5 pm PST. Space is limited. You can attend via phone or via internet! Reserve your Teleseminar line now at: Title: Mid-Summer Activities to Improve Your Child’s Skills and Still Have Fun Time: Wednesday, July 14th at 5:00pm Pacific Listening method: Phone + Web Simulcast To attend, visit: Mid-Summer Training Call LD Specialist and Board Certified Educational Therapist Bonnie Terry, M. Ed., is answering your questions about summer activities to help your child improve their skills. The teleseminar will be recorded; if you can't attend, you'll be able to listen later. Plus special surprise bonus just for registering! Those that attend live will receive another surprise FREE gift. Mid-Summer Training Call

Searching for Mid-Summer Activities to Improve Your Child's Learning Skills and Still Have Fun?

July 8th, 2010
It’s the almost middle of Summer Vacation and as you know, it is the perfect time to give your child a boost in their learning skills, but you still want to have fun… Join Bonnie Terry’s call and find out what you can do in just 20 minutes a day to boost your child’s reading, writing, and math skills and have fun at the same time. I'm hosting a FREE Live Teleseminar on Wednesday July 14th at 8 pm Eastern, 7 pm Central, 6 pm Mountain, and 5 pm Pacific. Upon registering you will receive a FREE Handbook on the 5 steps you can take to help your child over the summer even if they have a learning problem, LD, dyslexia. The activities and steps are for all age students - kindergarten through adults. Those that attend the Live Teleseminar will also receive a surprise FREE gift. And, of course, if you can’t make it live on the call, you will get access to the recording! Mid-Summer Training Call FREE Live Teleseminar on Wednesday July 14th at 8 pm Eastern, 7 pm Central, 6 pm Mountain, and 5 pm Pacific. Space is limited. You can attend via phone or via internet! Reserve your space for the Teleseminar now at: Title: Searching for Summer Activities to Improve Your Child’s Learning Skills and Still Have Fun? Time: Wednesday, July 14th at 5pm Pacific, 6 pm Mountain, 7 pm Central, 8 pm Eastern. Listening method: Phone + Web Simulcast To register, visit: Mid-Summer Training Call Learn About: 1. How to improve your child's reading, writing, and math skills in just 20 minutes a day 2. 5 steps you can take to help your child 3. Activities to do at home, in the yard, or in your neighborhood Bonnie Terry, M. Ed., BCET

How do I Motivate My Child?

June 14th, 2010
Hi, Bonnie. We spoke on the phone when I ordered your materials, which I've since received. Thanks very much! You mentioned at the time that you are open to questions as I began using the materials--and, of course, I now have those questions! -My son will be entering 3rd grade. His 2nd grade teacher noted his reading fluency as low proficient at end of year (technically passing, according to the DRA2-28 which they started using this year). At some point in the last few months of school, some one of his reading teachers at school appears to have told him that he read at 120 words per minute, and he adamantly clings to this. However, I clearly see where he is still skipping or guessing at words inaccurately (and I don't know if they measured that). So, when I put the 5 minutes to reading book in front of him, he was insulted--very put off. I tried explaining to him that we were not measuring speed so much as accuracy, and that we could chart his accuracy as it improved. I explained that even adults use this program. I offered to let him start with one of the later exercise if we would then go back to the first and didn't get much more cooperation than I had originally gotten (though he did a fairly good job of reading exercise 45). Do you have any thoughts on how to break the resistance without forcing him to do it? -My son's other complaint about the exercises is that they feel to him like tongue twisters because all the words sound the same, and he really doesn't like that. Do you have any suggestions for changing that perception? I am very interested to see if I can get him to use this program, and interested to see if we will see results--but I am meeting with HUGE resistance up front. I really don't want to force him to do it because I think that will diminish the results. Thanks for any suggestions! Joan Hi Joan, I'm glad you see that he isn't actually reading 120 words per minute with accuracy. I never understand how they are measuring the kids when they say things like that because you can see from what you've done already, that is NOT the REALITY! When you time him, you can show him what he actually did. That should start to get him to see the reality - his words per minute and mistakes per minute. Explain how you are scoring him. If you need to press the point, you can even have him total his words up after you time him, so he knows how many there are. I've had to do that with a few students over the years. I don't do it to be 'mean,' but sometimes they need a reality check so you can move forward. We start with easy words - because we are working on accuracy as well as speed. Big words are just little words (syllables) put together. If you can't read the small words accurately, you won't be able to read larger ones efficiently and accurately either - which will mean you will end up re-reading your social studies book or science book 3-4 times in order to be able to answer the questions. I know this, this happened not only with many students, but with my own son. In fact, he flung his 3 pound social studies book at me saying, "Mom, I've read it 3 times and still can't find the answers. You do it." This was because of his skipping, repeating, or mispronouncing words. Once we consistently did the 5 Minutes to Better Reading he was able to read his book one time and get the answers - because he read with accuracy in a quick amount of time. Doing the program - 5 minutes a day, will end up saving hours and hours of homework time. We are looking at the big picture here - making his life easier for the rest of his schooling - which at a minimum is the next 10 years (through high school). But, you really need to start at the beginning - even though it may seem easy at first. Even my adult students start at the beginning! You are competing against yourself, no one else! And, yes, some of the drills are like 'tongue twisters'. That is on purpose - to be sure you learn to read exactly what is there. Your son may think it is 'too easy', but his 'fussing' about it is actually telling you how much he needs it - that it is actually taxing and stretching his visual processing system. Hang in there! And remind him, it is only 5 minutes a day. It is not like you are expecting him to work for 2 hours or even one hour. You are only asking 5 minutes. And, when you are consistent, you will see results in just a few days. The more you do it, the easier it gets and the more they see themselves improving the easier it gets. Bonnie Terry, M. Ed., BCET

How to Help Your Child Improve Their Reading, Writing, & Math Skills in 20 Minutes a Day

March 10th, 2010
I have had such an overwhelming response from last night's call; I am truly humbled.  "We've already done some of the exercises you told us about. My kids thought they were fun! I just wish we had found you before we had spent thousands of dollars." Kathy G  "I like that I can use this for all of my kids, not just my struggling one. I like that. That's a big plus." Linda E.  "I was able to join the call via the web conference and from what I heard, it was very exciting! Then I had tech problems. Any chance of being able to listen again?" Elise C.  "I sooo appreciate your making it doable via computer." Tricia L  "Thank you so much for the information!" Rachel B  "I didn't know there were so many easy ways I could help my son." Susan B For those of you that were unable to attend, I have twisted Susan's arm and we are doing it again this Saturday. This is another chance for you to join in to the FREE private training call. How to Help Your Child Improve Their Reading, Writing, & Math Skills in 20 Minutes a Day Sat. March 13th 11am PST, noon MST, 1pm CST, and 2pm EST. Register here: http://www.homeworkwars.com/privatetrainingcall/ Upon registration, you will receive the call in information and a Handbook on How to Help Your Child Improve Their Skills.                                                                                                                                                                                       You can either call in or attend via the web. Bonnie Terry, M. Ed., BCET
Next Page »